UBP blog

02/08/2010

The security of your identity is only as strong as the passwords you keep—Part 1

If you lived during the Middle Ages and had a castle, you’d want to prevent invaders from breaking in, destroying your property, kidnapping your loved ones, etc. So what would you do? Build a moat, correct?

Now most, if not all of you, would pull out all the stops to create the deepest, most crocodile-filled moat imaginable. After all, it would be your only barrier for keeping invaders out. When creating passwords for your personal information you should use this exact same logic.

That’s because just like a moat is the only barrier keeping invaders out of a castle, your passwords are often your only barrier standing between personal information and identity thieves.

All passwords you use to access personal information (both online and off) should be both strong and secret. This blog post will educate you on how to keep them strong.

What is a strong password?

A strong password is one that includes:

  • 6 or more characters
  • Letters numbers and symbols
  • At least one case change

When creating your passwords, make sure that they are both easy for you to remember and difficult for others to guess.  If your password contains two distinct words or proper names, make sure they are unrelated to one another. 

One strategy you can use to create a strong, memorable password is to use the first letter of every word in a popular saying (making at least one of the letters uppercase) and add a number plus a symbol to the end. For example, a strong password using the popular saying “Speak softly and carry a big stick” might be Ss&cabs13.

Once you’ve set a strong password, you should also take the following precautions:

  • Never use the same password for more than one of your main accounts: If you do, it could take just one security breach to compromise everything in all of your accounts.
  • Change your passwords regularly: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulations (OCABR) recommends that individuals change their passwords for access to personal information at least every 6 months.  A helpful tip for reminding yourself to do this is to use a recurring event such as a time to change your password (i.e. change your password every daylight savings time).

For any entity that employs and/or does business with Massachusetts residents, OCABR has passed our nation’s toughest ID theft law to date—Standards for the Protection of Personal Information of Residents of the Commonwealth (201 CMR 17.00).

Businesses must be fully compliant with the law by March 1, 2010. Is all your company’s personal information on Massachusetts residents encrypted and/or protected? Do you have a Written Information Security Plan in place?

These are just a few of the 201 CMR 17.00 requirements that must be met. Attend our  free webinar February 11th at 2 pm and in just 30 minutes you’ll know the answers to these questions plus so much more.

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