UBP blog

12/30/2009

The top 4 policies employers should update for the New Year

Nearly all of us like to kick of the new year with a resolution; get in shape, eat healthier, break a bad habit, manage your money better, the list goes on. The new year gives us all a clean slate and our resolutions motivate us to start the year off right.

For HR professionals, one of the many ways to start the year off right is to make sure all policies in your employee handbooks are up-to-date and compliant with the latest regulations. This will help you strengthen your case in the event that an employee (or former employee) sues you for any type of bias.

When updating your handbook for the new year, employers and HR professionals should look at the following 4 policies first:

  1. FMLA: The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has revised FMLA Regulations several times this past year and requires employers to provide employees a notice of their updated FMLA rights in their handbook (or a handout for new hires). If employers fail to do this and an employee files an FMLA suit, failure to notify is the first area lawyers will attack.
  2. Genetic Discrimination: The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) went into effect late this year prohibiting employers from using genetic information in any employment-related decisions.  This means that employers will need to update their handbooks so that genetic information is listed as one of the “protected traits” with EEO status.
  3. Privacy and electronic devices: Many employees may have privacy expectations in their use of company computers. However, courts generally rule that employers can monitor computer and electronic device usage—since these devices are, in fact, company property. Employers may also limit or prohibit certain activities such as sending inappropriate emails or accessing “adult” materials.  The handbook is often a very effective way for employers to notify employees of their monitoring practices and prohibited activities.
  4. Social networking: New media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs have become a part of so many of our lives –both personal and professional. Social networking websites are a great way for companies to get their names out there and solidify their brands in the minds of consumers. However, if any employee makes disparaging remarks about his or her employer on Facebook or blogs about trade secrets, new media can become your company’s worst nightmare.

To combat this, many employers have put social media policies in place. If you have one of these policies, the time is now to make sure it’s in your handbook and up to date.

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: